Tag Archives: history

Could you keep the Bucks Village Journal going?

I am once again on the hunt for someone who would love to take over the Bucks Village Journal…could that be you?

I love the website & the content it holds but I just don’t have the time to keep it going & due to health, I can’t do the networking needed or attend the events that would help to keep some interesting posts about what is going on in our beautiful area.

There is so much that could be reported on locally, so much more history to share & so many events that could be covered.

If this idea would interest you, please email me at kaye.townsend@btinternet.com

I look forward to hearing from you, Kaye.

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Look Back In Time – Now & Then part 6

Bourne End Station in 1921 compared with May 2018

 

Bourne End Station Looking Towards High Wycombe in 1910 compared with May 2018

 

Not the perfect angle – Children outside the school entrance in Wooburn Town in 1905 compared to May 2018

 

Furlong Road in Bourne end in 1911 compared to May 2018

Look Back In Time -Now & Then ~ Part 5

St. Mark’s Church in 1905 compared to 20th May 2018

 

Cores End crossing in 1969/70 compared to 20th May 2018

 

Hedsor Road, cottages to the left of the Walnut Tree in 1930’s compared to 20th May 2018

 

Red Lion, Hedsor Rd in 1920’s compared to 20th May 2018

 

From train station looking towards Penny’s Corner in 1920 compared to 20th May 2018

 

 

Look Back In Time -Now & Then ~ Part 4

This time a walk around The Green.

Leaving Wooburn Green on Wycombe Lane Road in 1905 compared to 16th May 2018

 

Red Lion Public House in 1920’s compared to 16th May 2018

 

Leaving The Green Towards Wooburn Town in 1938 compared to 16th May 2018

 

Looking Towards The Green in 1938 compared to 16th May 2018

 

Looking towards The Queen & Albert – No date compared to 16th May 2018

 

 

 

Look Back In Time -Now & Then ~ Part 3

Here we go with part 3!

Royalty Cinema opened in 1934 compared to 7th May 2018

 

The Parade in Bourne End in 1920’s compared to 8th May 2018

 

Hedsor Road, just up from the Garibaldi pub compared to 10th May 2018

 

Hedsor Road 1910 compared to 10th May 2018

 

The Parade in Bourne End in 1980’s compared to 8th May 2018

 

 

Look Back In Time -Now & Then ~ Part 2

Here are a few more to keep you going!

Glory Mill in 1910 compared with 7th May 2018

 

The Walnut Tree in 1905 compared to 10th May 2018

 

Sadly no date for this compared to 10th May 2018

 

Penny’s Corner in late 1970’s compared to 7th May 2018

 

The White House in late 1970’s compared to 7th May 2018

 

 

 

Gill Hoare Shares More Memories – Furlong Road

We are very lucky recently with people recalling their memories of the area…..Gill Hoare has sent in some more of her Bourne End memories, this time in the Furlong Road area as she does a mental walk through the village.

“Where were we with our walk through Bourne End?….Oh yes we have just visited Bourne End School and are turning into Furlong Road. So on the left hand side the School Masters House then the school playground while across Furlong Road is a small parade of shops.

Mr Cheek the Greengrocer, who my good friend David Birch who lived at that time in Brookfield Road in Wooburn, tells me, he remembers an incident when Mr Cheek drove his ancient open back truck which boasted a steering wheel not on the right hand side or the left hand side of the truck but slap bang in the middle and it was used as a mobile shop around the villages – one day on the steep Brookfield Road the vans brakes failed and the van careered down the road, over the main road, and into the River Wye shedding apples and potatoes etc to float down the river – gives a whole new twist to apple bobbing!!

Alex Television Shop…although back in the early ’50’s not too many homes sported a television, radio was the thing in the mornings “Workers Play Time, afternoons “Listen with Mother” and “Mrs Dales Diary” (she was alway worried about Jim!) Evenings were spent gathered around the radio listening to “Journey into Space” staring Lemmy and Co. Where on earth did I dig all that up from??!! However a lot of folk sported a tele when it was the Coronation in 1953. We didn’t have a television till many years later – always felt deprived!!

Next was Woodbridge the Ironmongers and Hard Ware shop, a mainstay of the village, if they didn’t sell it – it did not exist!

Next – if I remember rightly – was Mr Gray the men’s outfitters – and I could never work out why – but on the wall outside was a Chewing Gum Machine needing one old penny to get the gum, very handy for using a penny from the Sunday School collection money before going into the Methodist Chapel!

I remember a “Ladies Wear” shop called Lilla Palmer – was it run or owned by Mrs Bocock?

Macphersons was a grocery shop then a Co-op. Then a separate large building was the main Post Office run by the Voiseys and in more recent years it is an Aquarium.

On the left hand side was the School Canteen at the side of the school playground and next along was the Methodist Chapel (I remember going to Sunday School and the Sunday evening Service…..you will remember we didn’t have a television!!

Across the road a row of houses then Wilks the Nurseries with a lot of land for green houses. More houses to take you up to Recreation Road – the park was used by the school games and sports days.

Back to the left hand side where my grandparents lived at 2 Ingledale Villas one of a row of semi detached houses (which I notice are still standing) before the family moved to Chalklands in 1938. Long before my time I hasten to add!!

After the row of semi – detached houses was some waste land later used as a car park for Jacksons employees opposite the Mill site.

More houses filled the right hand side of the road up to the many buildings that formed Jacksons Millboard and Fibre Company with the two mighty chimneys, an important part of Bourne End with employment for over 800 people from the surrounding villages.
Fond memories of the Mill where I started work in the accounts office in 1959 getting £3 a week…..before deductions!! A lot of Bourne End people worked in the offices – some travelled from Marlow on the Marlow Donkey and some long distance from Wycombe!!

The payroll was huge about 850 people working in the various departments of the Mill and everyone was paid, every week, in cash. The payroll was processed in the Book Keeping Department once all the information had been made up and checked from the Time Keeping Office, the Bonus Section where calculations were done on slide rules, and all checked in the Comptometer Office. The vast payrolls were completed and checked and passed to the Wages Office. The cash was ordered from the local Lloyds Bank and collected from there and made up into Pay envelopes. One very memorable Friday morning staff arrived to find the safe where the pay packets were stored was open and empty the robbers had arrived overnight and taken the lot! The television people arrived and one of the Directors was filmed revealing the empty safe…..all that was seen on the News that evening was an arm pulling back the safe door…no instant stardom there!! Lloyds Bank was “done” the very same night. The village bussed with the happenings! Everyone got paid as usual thanks to a lot of speedy work!! As an after thought the Wages Office was moved upstairs!!!

Jacksons offered a huge sports ground so there was football, cricket, bowls and tennis the large canteen saw dances, Children’s Christmas Parties and served on Saturday evenings as a Bingo Hall. There was a Social Club which doubled as a Cricket Tea Room An annual Mill trip to the Sea Side with a fleet of 50 odd Coaches for mill workers and their families to enjoy the day.

It had all finished by the early ’70’s the Mill buildings and the chimneys gone I believe it is an industrial estate now and the lovely, vast sports ground is now a housing development”.

Well that was Furlong Road in days passed…..I hope you enjoy it!! More to come!

Memories of Flackwell Heath by Barbara Murfin – Cherrypicking with Annie Lorry

Please go to the page “Articles of Local Interest” to see the full story which will be 83 pages when I have added them all! Thankyou so much Barbara.

 

Cherrypicking with Annie Lorry.

A Family living in Flackwell Heath in the 1930’s 1940’s 1950’s 1960’s and a tiny bit of the 1970’s.
” Hello, my name is Barbara Annie Murfin. The year is 2018. I live in the north of Staffordshire within the Market Town of Leek. The town of Leek nestles at the bottom of the Pennine Chain. Over the tops, local speak, on the other side of the hill is the Victorian Spa Town of Buxton. Just beyond Leek are the wild heather clad Staffordshire Moorlands, rugged fields, bleak in winter full of wild life in summer. There was a time wallabies, escaped ones, roamed the moorlands but sadly no sightings have been seen for years. Leek like most towns grew as a staging post, for changing horses. Leek being between Manchester and Derby. Most of the older, larger pubs had stabling attached. The Potteries, Stoke on Trent just 10 miles south on the A53, famous throughout the world for it household pottery items. Down the same road, and another great transport invention the Trent and Mersey Canal. Thanks to Josiah Wedgwood and friends. Josiah needed a safe bump free way of transporting his fragile pottery, in the days of pot holes and turn pikes. Stoke on Trent is built on red clay and coal. A “ pothole” was made by an artisan potter just digging up available clay from outside his door.

Leek has the River Churnet running around it’s outskirts. The Churnet eventually joining the River Trent. In Victorian times till within recent memory, silk was spun and dyed in Leek. The waters of the River Churnet dying silk Raven Black. Not blue / black or nearly black, Raven Black. When Queen Victoria’s Husband Prince Albert died, Victoria declared full morning dress. Leek was at full stretch to dye all the silk the Royal Court required.

I have lived in Leek since 1973 and think it’s a pretty good place to be. In 2015 I came down to Flackwell Heath to walk around the village with Sally Scargill, from the History Group. There were so many changes since 1973 I asked would it be ok if I wrote my memories down. The answer was yes. So here they are.

At school I had a dreadful problem with writing anything down. So I tried writing very quickly, getting to the end of a piece as soon as possible. Spellings were hopeless, and many words were missed out. The teachers could not read it very well, but I could, and saw no problem. It was not until I taught my self how to use a computer that I realized I am dyslexic. Thank you, thank you Bill Gates, and now as this is written on an iPad Steve Jobs and spell check. So the only way I can record my 60 + years of remembering is to chat to you. Please don’t expect any fancy grammatically correct sentences or clever words, they are beyond me. As I was considered intelligent but thick (!) at school I was channeled towards cooking. It sounds a bit like Downton Abby days, if you were a little slow or thick then you were sent to work in the big kitchens. Of course by the time you became cook your mathematical skills, working out quantities, portion control, and time schedules, writing (ordering), timing, hand eye coordination, and delegation skills were second to none. So as you can see I am, as they say now, way, way out of my comfort zone. Ask me to put on a sumptuous buffet for 300 people, that would be no trouble at all.”
Here we go.

Going south on the A 40 Oxford to London Road turn right at Loudwater. To narrow it down a little, after High Wycombe and it’s way before Beaconsfield. Follow your nose for about half a mile. When the road goes a hard left and follows the river Wye and on to Wooburn, you need to take the lane to the right, going up the hill. Between the Church, St. Peter’s Loudwater, and The Happy Union Pub. Treadaway Hill. Past the station yard over the railway line up the winding, dark steep hill to Flackwell Heath. Near the top by the pond the hill branches into two. Left to the group of cottages called The Common, on the right the main road leading to the main T junction at the village school, and Methodist Chapel. The Centre of the village, Chapel Lane eventually became large enough to make it a cross-road, now I believe it’s a roundabout.

Read more…

First Mayor of High Wycombe was Rodger Outred in 1285

Did anyone see this in The Daily Mail Weekend Magazine? Lots of old photos from around the country changed into colour.

This is the newly installed Mayor of High Wycombe, William S Toms on 9th November 1932. High Wycombe has an unbroken line of mayors going back to Rodger Outred  in 1285. Until 1485 a mayor has held office for two to three years. Now he is elected annually.
On 30th June 1985, a procession took place to celebrate 700 years since the first Mayor of High Wycombe.

Photo courtesy of The Daily Mail

Gill’s Bourne End Village Memories Continued

Gill Hoare’s last description of Bourne End Village as it was when she was a child, went down enormously well. Below, Gill has very kindly sent in another  taking us a little further around the village. Thank you Gill, I know this will be of great interest just as your first article was.

Well Bourne End people…are you all ready to continue our jaunt around the village?

We got as far as the old Doctors Surgery, which, my long time friend David Birch reminds me, was called St Edmunds. I cannot remember there being any buildings past there – a lot of gardens lurked behind big hedges along the road till the corner where the Chemist is, and always has been a Chemist in my memory. The adjoining building, now the estate agents has always been an office of some kind.

Cross over Wharf Lane and heading in the direction of Bourne End Station a lot of high hedges hid a dwelling, all dark and mysterious..the sort of place you ran past very quickly! Of course it might well not have been as scary as it seemed!

The first part of Station Road on the right hand side was, as Roger Taplin (an ex Chalklands man) reminds me, a stable yard which was immediately before The Firefly which in a former life was named The Railway Hotel.

The Firefly could tell a few tales! I worked in Jacksons Office in Furlong Road and the pub was the nearest hostelry and it would have seen a vast number of celebrations of Jacksons staff – especially the much enjoyed Christmas Eve celebrations! Enough said!

Opposite the Firefly were some small shops. The first a Newsagent, then Websters the coal office and a tiny, tiny shop next to the railway line Mrs Dunhams Wool Shop where ardent knitters could choose a pattern for a jumper, or whatever, and the kind lady would keep the wool to be bought as and when needed or indeed be afforded.

Over the railway lines…that was when the train journeyed from Bourne End to High Wycombe…yes Bourne End was well catered for with travel to High Wycombe and Marlow – courtesy of the Marlow Donkey and to Maidenhead, and a single decker bus between Bourne End and Marlow. Bourne End was a central hub with trains and buses to the three main places. I used the train to Marlow when I was courting my husband and the Station Master, who’s name escapes me, had a hobby of making wedding cakes, and, yes, he made a three tier wedding cake for John and I in 1967!!!

Next to the Station was a sweet shop and opposite in the tiny place which was later an antique shop, was Mr Dabbs the greengrocer. Then where the Orchard Surgery is now was the home of Dr Selborne Bailey and next to that St Marks Church.

Opposite St Marks was Hall and North the grocers and wine shop. Roger Taplin tells me his Dad was Manager there at some point. I can not think the Wine Shop had a lot of business in those days but the grocery section was well used my Mum used to go there each Monday afternoon to place an order and pay for same at the cash desk! In later years when my brother and I had left school and gone to work she worked there! I remember her telling us that one afternoon a very well dressed gentleman went into the wine shop, he was so polite and purchased any amount of bottles which my Mum carried out to his car for him while he wrote a cheque for his purchases. Guess what..the cheque bounced and he was never seen again!! Who would have thought it??!!

Where Alfred Court is now was the Bourne End School. It had been there long enough for both my Grandfather and later on my Mum to have been there and then it was my turn!

I started there at five and my teacher was Miss Dodds the building was very old and as such boasted an outside block of bucket toilets! This was replaced by a new toilet block and even rows of wash basins built during the summer break one year..great rejoicing!!

Year two class presided over by Mrs Beeson had a huge open fire in the classroom – no Health and Safety back then – and in the winter the regulation daily bottles of milk were put to warm in front of the blazing fire – the very thought still makes me shudder!!

Each day morning break time was not complete without a currant bun. Children brought into school one penny and whoever was “bun monitor” collected the coins and went across the road to Spindlers the bakers to order the buns. I loved being “bun monitor” quite an important job!! Back then we left the junior school at 11 to go to senior school. In previous years in my Grandfathers time, they left school aged 12 to start work.

Mr GJ Drewett was the Headmaster and he used to read out loud from a book..but I always remember it being the same book “Rikki Tikki Tavi by Rudyard Kipling and he used to fall asleep whilst reading – not that the class took advantage of course!!

All good things to reflect on, tales to tell, school friends well remembered and some friendships still strong today.

Directly opposite the School was a Garage, and next to it the Spindlers Bakery with Ruth in charge of the shop. How sad that some of the lovely shops disappear.

Gill Hoare

 

 

Read About Gill’s Memories of Bourne End, 60 years Ago.

Gill Hoare has kindly written a glimpse into her memories of the village when she was a child, around 60 years ago.

Thankyou Gill, I know people will enjoy the read.

Take a walk with me to remember (or, for the new Bourne Enders, to find out) exactly how the village used to look some 60 odd years ago, who were the main players, and just where all the shops were and how the village worked!

Let us start on the Marlow Road at the bottom of Blind Lane where Cressington Place Estate is built – much to the horror of villagers – on The Water Cress Beds – the ever gurgling and bubbling beds that had been there goodness know how long.

The garage is a newish acquisition – the “new build” office block was home to a Solicitors office and others but no longer around. The new retirement complex seems to be where both the Billinghursts Builders yard and the Billinghurst family home were.

The new Co-op on the corner replaced Mr Whites “Corner Shop” selling ice cream, fizzy pop, sweets etc. Sundays in the summer was not complete without a block of vanilla ice cream for pudding – it used to be my task to go and buy it (for 1/-, 5 pence in today’s money) just before the Sunday lunch was served as not many people had a fridge in those days! The ice cream was indeed a treat and always looked forward to on a Sunday! I remember getting into trouble one day while on the ice cream run – on the way home clutching the ice cream, I met a boy who I got talking to for rather longer than I should, and on arriving home clutching a sodden mass found my lunch, cold, on the table and no one talking to me as the pudding was ruined!! Read more…

Bourne End Community Centre Website

This is a must! Go to http://www.bourneendcommunitycentre.org.uk & you will be able to take a look at 4 issues of Target magazine from 1966. See which shops,  garages, builders & more, were advertising back then. Perhaps you attended some of the events advertised or you remember the various family names mentioned.  I know it made me smile to see some of the adverts like Gaylors Garage, Clifford’s Dairies, Arthur Shortland Ltd, Launderama & Billinghurst & Sons Ltd. amongst many more. We even had 4 local Police Stations to call if needed. If you love local history, then this will keep you busy for hours.

 

Newly published local book, “Up Narkover” by Karen Savage

Wooburn Narkovians Cricket Club celebrate their 80th Anniversary this year, so to mark this occasion Karen Savage has written a book entitled “Up Narkover”.

The story of cricket in Wooburn starts with the Gilbey family who lived in Wooburn House and the formation of Wooburn Narkovians Cricket Club in 1936. Find out how the Narkovians got their unusual name & other interesting facts about your local cricket club.

The book containing over 200 full colour pages, contains 8 decades of history as well as facts and figures along with many interesting photos.

The book is an ideal read for cricket lovers and locals alike & is priced at £15, with all profits going to WNCC.

To obtain your copy contact the author Karen Savage on 01628 529216 or email:  savage.karen@btinternet.com

Karen's book